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Re: Code/Data Hooks for Storytelling

#16
Hyperion wrote:
Thu Jan 25, 2018 2:48 am
So many possibilities.
:D :D :thumbup: :clap:

I know you and others have been prolific in suggestions for Limit Theory, Hyperion, and I think you'll find I responded warmly to many of your ideas. I'm unsure how much those suggestions have influenced Josh. It's hard to know what exactly the LT Team have in mind concerning gameplay. :angel:

@Flatfingers

I also know the ideas for my game differ in some aspects to what you would like to see in LT, Flat, but you are (or should be) aware that I appreciate your presence here. It's been a pleasure for me to read your input as an experienced blogger. :D
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Re: Code/Data Hooks for Storytelling

#17
Victor Tombs wrote:
Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:21 am
I know you and others have been prolific in suggestions for Limit Theory, Hyperion, and I think you'll find I responded warmly to many of your ideas. I'm unsure how much those suggestions have influenced Josh. It's hard to know what exactly the LT Team have in mind concerning gameplay. :angel:

In fact, my suggestion to revisit adding "hooks" to LT for storytelling was explicitly (in my mind) as much for Hyperion as for you, Victor.

Victor Tombs wrote:
Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:21 am
I also know the ideas for my game differ in some aspects to what you would like to see in LT, Flat, but you are (or should be) aware that I appreciate your presence here. It's been a pleasure for me to read your input as an experienced blogger. :D

Likewise, Victor, and I'm not offended or bothered in any way.

My feeling is that if LT can support freeform play, and structured, story-based play, it should -- it's being built as too wonderful a platform not to support both ways of having fun.

Easy for me to say as not-the-one making it, of course. :D
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Re: Code/Data Hooks for Storytelling

#18
I'm curious what sort of tools and editors would need to be developed for making narrative focused mods.

As stories generally contain 5 main elements: Character, Setting, Conflict, Plot, & Theme, what would we need to place those in a pre-existing, living world like LT?

Probably derived from the Ship Editor would be a generic Assets editor, where you could create and then define just about any inanimate, or possibly animate object, essentially ProcGen Blender.

An environment editor to place assets in systems and connect them to others, and ideally this could be done with varying degrees of precision vs vaguely defined zone.

An event editor, that allow you to spread specific scripts out over time.

A character editor? This could be almost anything, from simple pareidolic icons to an RPG stat list, to Sims-like character traits and need balancing...

A quest editor, defining success and failure conditions, when, where, how often it can occur, who can give it, who can take it.

This definitely isn't comprehensive, but it's worth starting the conversation now. What would you guys like to see? What features such such editors have?
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The conquest of Nature is to be achieved through Number and Measure.
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Imagination Fertilizer
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Re: Code/Data Hooks for Storytelling

#22
I don't normally do videos -- too frustrating in how long it takes to transfer information versus text -- but if I'm going to be namechecked then I guess I have to make an exception. :D (Thanks!)

Dr. Johnson's comments certainly do echo a lot of my own thoughts about how to generate content, including the importance of forms flowing plausibly from innate motivations -- there's a reason why things look and behave the way they do. (For giggles, I'll note that I actually created the thread here for Ultima Ratio Regum, the game Dr. Johnson's been developing.)

It's maybe also worth noting that this video was posted by "Games By Angelina," the project of games AI researcher Michael Cook.

Finally, "speech impediment?" As far as I can tell, it's just the special non-rhotic pronunciation that some English (especially around Kent, I believe) learn to use. Jonathan Ross is probably the most well-known person using this kind of pronunciation, but I've actually used it myself for voicing the speech of a character in my audiobook reading of the Horatio Hornblower novels.

At any rate, I'd love Joshadamlindsey to listen to this video to get some ideas for how visual/functional game content can be procedurally generated based on core variables. Nice find!

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