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What is your Myers-Briggs type?

ESTP
Total votes: 2 (3%)
ESFP
(No votes)
ISTP
Total votes: 1 (2%)
ISFP
Total votes: 2 (3%)
ESTJ
Total votes: 1 (2%)
ESFJ
(No votes)
ISTJ
Total votes: 5 (8%)
ISFJ
Total votes: 2 (3%)
ENTP
Total votes: 3 (5%)
ENTJ
Total votes: 5 (8%)
INTP
Total votes: 22 (34%)
INTJ
Total votes: 6 (9%)
ENFP
Total votes: 7 (11%)
ENFJ
(No votes)
INFP
Total votes: 3 (5%)
INFJ
Total votes: 6 (9%)
Total votes: 65
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#61
DigitalDuck wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 4:45 am
Flatfingers wrote:
Fri May 11, 2018 11:37 am
They don't like the MBTI's "forced dichotomization."
But doesn't the Big Five model do exactly the same thing?
I guess in MBTI having even a small score in say, N, still puts you in the N 'box' just like someone with a big score. With Big Five you just get a score across the five categories. There's no "you're a this, not a that"

Comes to the same thing in my opinion, but whatever~
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#62
DigitalDuck wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 4:45 am
Flatfingers wrote:
Fri May 11, 2018 11:37 am
They don't like the MBTI's "forced dichotomization."
But doesn't the Big Five model do exactly the same thing?

Big Five adherents would say no, their scales are built like Josh's scales for NPC personality traits: as a single trait whose strength ranges from 0 to 100. So someone might be very Conscientious, or only somewhat Conscientious.

This is said to be different from the MBTI model, which identifies two endpoints for each of the four axes with the 0 point between them. If you score even a single point more in favor of Thinking versus Feeling, for example, you get put in the "T" box. (I don't actually recommend believing a "test" for figuring out MB type, but this is how Big Five critics of MBTI often frame their objection.)

Functionally, of course, you're right. The Openness index, for example, is described by Big Five fans as ranging from "totally open to everything" to "not open to everything." But I agree that it's not unreasonable to look at this as functionally -- meaning as humans express psychological preferences as actual behaviors -- ranging from "totally open to everything" to "actively rejects everything." In other words, an MBTI adherent would say the 0 point on each of the Big Five axes is actually the opposite preference, not just the lack of that preference, effectively making each of the OCEAN axes a two-value trait just as in MBTI.

I personally find a two-valued model more useful. I think it captures more of the true range of human motivation. I also agree somewhat with the Big Five criticism of MBTI as putting people in boxes -- as though if you prefer Judging over Perceiving even slightly, You Are A Judger. In reality, I expect a plot of each of the four MBTI axes would show a bimodal distribution, with humps somewhere around the midpoint of each of the two preferences for each axis. That would better reflect that these preferences are analog, not binary, but that there are still real and meaningful patterns of preference -- most people really do have a visible preference either for wanting to get things settled now (Judging), or for wanting to get more information before making a decision (Perceiving), and so on for the other three axes identified in the MBTI model.

This utility of a model with bi-valued axes is, BTW, one of the reasons why I've suggested to Josh that he might consider adapting his NPC personality model to this style. This would avoid naming any individual trait in a negative way (e.g., "Greedy"), and treat each trait as having two equally-valuable (unless taken to the extreme values) ways of expressing that trait (e.g., a range from "Acquisitive" to "Charitable").
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#63
First ISTP, reporting in.

I – Introversion preferred to extraversion: ISTPs tend to be quiet and reserved. They generally prefer interacting with a few close friends rather than a wide circle of acquaintances, and they expend energy in social situations (whereas extroverts gain energy).[5]
S – Sensing preferred to intuition: ISTPs tend to be more concrete than abstract. They focus their attention on the details rather than the big picture, and on immediate realities rather than future possibilities.[6]
T – Thinking preferred to feeling: ISTPs tend to rely on objective criteria rather than personal values. When making decisions, they generally give more weight to logic than to social considerations.[7]
P – Perception preferred to judgment: ISTPs tend to withhold judgment and delay important decisions, preferring to "keep their options open" should circumstances change.[8]
Spoiler:      SHOW
According to Myers-Briggs, ISTPs excel at analyzing situations to reach the heart of a problem so that they can swiftly implement a functional repair, making them ideally suited to the field of engineering.

(Well cra*, and here i am working at court)

Naturally quiet people, they are interested in understanding how systems operate, focusing on efficient operation and structure. But contrary to their seemingly detached nature, ISTPs are often capable of humorously insightful observations about the world around them, and will display a seemingly uncharacteristic enthusiasm for things of great interest to them. ISTPs abhor waste (be it in time, effort, and/or resources) but are highly adaptable, making them receptive to new information and approaches. They enjoy exploring new things, and can become bored with repetitiveness and routine. They can also be closet daredevils who gravitate toward fast-moving or risky hobbies (such as bungee jumping, hang gliding, racing, motorcycling, and skydiving), recreational sports (such as downhill skiing, paintball, ice hockey, and scuba diving), and careers (such as aviation, EMT, and firefighting).

ISTPs may sometimes seem to act without regard for procedures, directions, protocol, or even their own safety. But while their approach may seem haphazard, it is in fact based on a broad store of knowledge collected over time through quiet action and keen observation. The upside of this characteristic is that ISTPs often excel in high-pressure and/or emergency situations, where their knowledge and experience can be immediately brought to bear — usually with the ISTP's characteristic unflappability. When others are just beginning to grasp the details of the situation, ISTPs are often (and sometimes from the perspective of those familiar with the ISTP, unexpectedly) resolving it. In personal matters, ISTPs enjoy self-sufficiency and take pride in developing their own solutions to problems.

ISTPs can often be a frustration to their friends or partners due to a combination of mixed social signals and a propensity to ignore everyone while deeply absorbed in a favored task. While ISTPs will readily participate in group activities that hold immediate interest for them — and can be a great source of entertainment for all who participate — they will often eschew (either partially or entirely) the routine social interactions surrounding those group activities. Without intending any insult, the ISTP often concludes that such interactions — those that others might view as cordial or even expected — are redundant and superfluous; for the ISTP, the social event ended when the activity of interest concluded. Such behavior is often misinterpreted by others as an actively antisocial attitude when in fact ISTPs are simply uninterested in engaging in group-related small-talk. Should a topic of interest come up, the ISTP may suddenly re-engage the social group, only to disengage almost as abruptly when the topic passes. The ISTP should be mindful that their tendency toward aloofness (be it real or perceived) could have a negative impact on otherwise great relationships.

ISTPs are content to let others live according to their own rules and preferences — as long as the favor is reciprocated. It has been observed that a slogan that best describes this ISTP attitude is "Don't Tread On Me." ISTPs will endure reasonable impositions without complaint; but if their "territory" is encroached upon, eroded, or violated, their quiet, easy-going nature is quickly abandoned in favor of stubborn, staunch, and uncharacteristically vocal defense of what they view as rightfully theirs — and those around the once laissez faire ISTP suddenly find themselves off-guard and unexpectedly "walking on eggshells." Unfortunately for others, often only the ISTP knows at which point this line will be crossed — providing yet another potential source of mixed signals with which ISTPs inadvertently surprise those around them.
More people want exploding kittens than exploding ships. Somehow, this makes me happy.
- credits go to dwmagus
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#67
(me too, but dont tell anyone)

J – Judgment preferred to perception: INFJs tend to plan their activities and make decisions early. They derive a sense of control through predictability.

From the very definition of J, LT does not sound like a primary target for you. :think:

Or maybe you derive a sense of control trough predicting Joshs unpredictabillity.
More people want exploding kittens than exploding ships. Somehow, this makes me happy.
- credits go to dwmagus
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#69
HappyGhecko wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:21 am
First ISTP, reporting in.

Excellent! I hope you'll stay, too. For a group to have a real diversity of ways of looking at the world, and differing gifts for handling the variety of challenges and opportunities the world throws at us, is really helpful -- and in the case of humanity at large, a survival feature, I think.

In fact, there's one way in particular that people who are nearest the ISTP pattern are absolutely vital to making good games: they are among the most brilliant testers and QA geniuses a game can ever hope to have.

Other types (and I'll stick to temperaments here) can be helpful because of their own innate understandings of what's important. SJ Guardians excel at making sure every requirement has a corresponding test procedure, and that all unit test and integration tests are performed and passed. This gets you to your baseline of confirming that the game is working as designed. (And they make sure that every change gets documented and version controlled and tested, too.) These are also some of your best testers for finding out how the majority of gamers (Achievers in Bartle's typology) will perceive your game, especially in its mechanics. Are the rules of play clear? Is how to accomplish goals described simply and comprehensibly? Are the mechanics easy to use and fun even when repeated for hours? Is success rewarded with a satisfying set of extrinsic rewards, such as good (and occasionally great) loot or leaderboards? SJs will make sure you know. :D

NT Rationals bring a different interest to testing; what they're most interested in seeing is how the world of the game surprises them. In a way, this is the opposite goal from the SJs -- where the SJs are assessing clarity and stability, NTs want to see dynamic systems banging together to produce unexpected (but plausible!) consequences. And at that point, they'll start mapping the behavior of every system -- if your crafting system isn't interesting, or there's not enough variety in opponent behaviors, or the world isn't complex enough to support a consequential decision-making feedback loop, they'll spot these things almost immediately... and then have pages of suggestions for "fixing" these "defects."

NF Idealists are the visionaries. They're not that interested in mechanics or dynamics; what grabs them is when a work of art means something. Is there a gripping story? Are there interesting characters they can care about? NFs will instinctively know immediately whether your game says something, whether it delivers a deeper theme beyond action and exploration. Articulate NF game testers, should you be lucky enough to find some, will be your best source of knowing whether the overall "feel" of the game you dreamed of making is coming through or not. Which really is the point of making the game.

And then there are the SPs. Oh, my. Love 'em, hate 'em, whatever -- you need 'em. Because they're the ones who will, without even trying, IMMEDIATELY break your game completely by doing something that no sane, ethical human being would ever think to do. These are the jaw-dropping speedrunners, the glitch-finders, the NPC-tormentors, the system-confusers, the rule-breakers, and the balance-destroyers. Let's say you've designed part of your game around no character ever having more than X amount of something. The SP tester will write a script or a bot that gives their character 1000X to see what kind of mayhem ensues. And that is exactly what you as a game developer need, because it is a 100% certainty that if there is a way for your game to fail -- or be made to fail -- there are gamers who will find this way within minutes after you release your game. And then they'll make sure the gaming press know about it. Your goal as a game developer is to attract SP testers who'll perform these horrifying feats before you release your game, so that you do something about the worst cases before the thing goes live.

So it delights me to see non-INTPs active here. Not just because I think Josh might benefit from their testing results, but because they make a forum more interesting.

I mean, as someone who's very close to the INTP pattern, it's a hoot to me to be around so many other people like me. That's... reeeeeeally rare. Even so, I think this forum (and any other group of any meaningful size) is better off with a good mix of temperaments. As long as they understand there are moderation rules (especially for the Idealists and Guardians), getting all these perspectives on the various subjects of interest helps to insure that the important questions get asked.

...and yes, we need the Judgers, too. Somebody has to haul the worst theorycrafters back down to Earth where their less-crazy ideas might find some application. ;)
Post

Re: Myers-Briggs Personality Type Survey II

#70
Flatfingers wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 12:07 am
HappyGhecko wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:21 am
...

And then there are the SPs. Oh, my. Love 'em, hate 'em, whatever -- you need 'em. Because they're the ones who will, without even trying, IMMEDIATELY break your game completely by doing something that no sane, ethical human being would ever think to do. These are the jaw-dropping speedrunners, the glitch-finders, the NPC-tormentors, the system-confusers, the rule-breakers, and the balance-destroyers.
Glitch-finder, Npc-tormentor, system-confuser and balance-destroyer fit the bill surprisingly well.

Also i have been sticking around (officially) for the last 4 years and i visit the forum quite often. I will be more active in the forum itself if i have something to torment, destroy and confuse ... to test. :angel:

Also being near the ISTP pattern is a curse in itself, if you play games like Fallout etc.. I encounter more bugs, glitches and other weird stuff in an hour then, as you put it, a sane and ethical person in 10.
More people want exploding kittens than exploding ships. Somehow, this makes me happy.
- credits go to dwmagus

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