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Re: All things Star Wars.

#453
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Besides Dark Saber I didn't notice any other EU references.
With how the films have been done thus far, I would actually rather that they discard the Boba Fett idea too. I took the name based off of the Boba Fett found in the Young Jedi Knights book series, and since it is clearly non-cannon at this point I'd rather not have Fett's life shamed any more than it already is.

Rogue One showed that there are indeed other people living in the universe other than the Skywalkers. I hope Disney peruses these stories and borrows content from the novels when appropriate. Please keep the iconic yellow scrolling text at the beginning of each film, and tell us new tales about those who live in this universe. For that matter, scrap VIII and IX. You failed to give Solo a proper death and I don't trust you with the two remaining films.

I am now interested in the years leading up to the New Order, the events that created the rebel alliance, and the lives of those who saw these events taking place but didn't care to directly help either side directly. Tell me about pirates, the Jedi, smugglers, and the Sith. Touch on the species that aren't human and give them a voice, values, and characteristics. The Star Wars universe is a very rich one, but only if you allow it to be. Cut the garbage and unnecessary planet hopping and give me films which will be on par with Marvel's Avengers.

Finally, READ THE EU books. Understand how stuff works, get an idea about the force from watching the original unedited trilogy. Then EXPAND, develop, and create film that will be passed on from generation to generation.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#454
Cornflakes_91 wrote:just saw rogue one and found some more EU hints in it
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the darksaber is a thing :D at least in the imperial archives.
And an old republic style vertical hammerhead ship also appeared.
And prolly a few other things i missed because im not that deep into EU stuff

the lack of dead bothans is also disturbing
I realize the hammerhead style ships are also in the old republic, but that's actually a nice little reference to the Rebels animated series, which shows them acquiring it. A few other Rebels references in there too.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#455
@BFett I wouldn't give up on an entire trilogy for the way they handled Solo's death. It seems clear that Harrison Ford kind of wanted to be done with Star Wars, and with him being the oldest member of the original stars, it makes sense for Disney to move on from him as well (the guy flies airplanes and helicopters and has crashed his plane before, don't want him to have an unfortunate accident before you kill him off, plus, he's old (74), and you never know what health issues may come up over time). Is your problem with him dying when he did, or is it with how they killed him? I can see arguments for changing how he died, but if the actor wants to move on and is aging, it makes sense to kill him off at this point. At least he came back and we got to see it and his death wasn't encapsulated in one of the books they are churning out.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#456
It's how Han Solo died that bothers me. At 74 I have no problem with him wanting to be in the film and wanting his character to die at some point. I always envisioned Han's death by either a kill shot during a gun fight or a death inside the Falcon. It was always envisioned as a death by a high profile bounty hunter at the end of an epic gun fight.

There is nothing epic about the way Han Solo died. That is my problem with the scene.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#457
BFett wrote: There is nothing epic about the way Han Solo died. That is my problem with the scene.
Yeah. I mean, trying to save his son from corruption and terrorizing the galaxy? What a sham.

Sarcasm aside, it could have done with a twist. Like, leave Han the detonator, get everyone else out. Have the confrontation with Kylo go down the same way, but leave Han that one last trick up his sleeve. Having failed to save his son, offer one last smirk and blow the place (Kylo would live of course).

I'm not sure it work given it would be at the expense of the heartbreak in the scene, but it's an option. Maybe as he's dying he just flicks a switch that starts a timer, that might work.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#459
Just saw Rouge One

My favourite Star Wars for sure.
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Unlike everyone else who apparently saw it, I didn't find the "pacing issues" with the first half. I actually quite enjoyed the slow build up. I loved the moral grey area with the rebellion. They are in fact terrorists from the empires point of view and sometimes they will be required to act like it. The digital construction of Tarkin was crazy good.

There was enough nostalgia plugged in without being too forced.

My only complaint would have been with Director Krennic. His character for the most part seemed out of place and kind of pointless. It's like they needed to have some big bad boss to die at the end.

A ton from the trailers never actually made it in too.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#460
BFett wrote:
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Besides Dark Saber I didn't notice any other EU references.
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Though not EU, the main ship from the Rebels series was one of the ships in the rebel attack fleet. You have to know it's there to see it however.

I really wished they would have stuck one of the Rebels cast in the background or something, doesn't appear that they did.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#461
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I always find it interesting to see what things professional movie reviewers latch onto. Often one person will make a fuss about something, and then a bunch of other reviewers will attack the same thing like sharks. In this film, it's the inclusion of Grand Moff Tarkin and a 19 year old Leia, both done using CGI. I've seen multiple reviews moralizing about how unethical it was to use a CGI Peter Cushing. To this, I have two responses. Firstly, the filmmakers consulted with Cushing's family to try to capture any subtle details as well as they could. They included him with permission of his estate. In doing so, I think they avoid the ethical questions that these uninformed professional reviewers raise from their cushy jobs at places like The Guardian, New York Times, etc (I have particular disdain for these publications). Secondly, you really cannot have a film about the first Death Star without Tarkin, especially with how Episode III makes him a part of the construction process form the beginning (see: final scenes of Ep. III). You can tell that it was CGI, but I thought they did a pretty good job with a tough task. On the young Leia point, they could have very easily avoided that shot by never showing her face and having her say what she said, and when I saw the film the first time I thought that is what they were going to do. Personally, I would have been fine with that, but I suppose they felt since they had already set a precedent with how they handled Tarkin, they felt they could do the same with Leia. I don't know what I would have done if I were sitting in the director's chair for that scene.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#462
masseffect7 wrote:
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I always find it interesting to see what things professional movie reviewers latch onto. Often one person will make a fuss about something, and then a bunch of other reviewers will attack the same thing like sharks. In this film, it's the inclusion of Grand Moff Tarkin and a 19 year old Leia, both done using CGI. I've seen multiple reviews moralizing about how unethical it was to use a CGI Peter Cushing. To this, I have two responses. Firstly, the filmmakers consulted with Cushing's family to try to capture any subtle details as well as they could. They included him with permission of his estate. In doing so, I think they avoid the ethical questions that these uninformed professional reviewers raise from their cushy jobs at places like The Guardian, New York Times, etc (I have particular disdain for these publications). Secondly, you really cannot have a film about the first Death Star without Tarkin, especially with how Episode III makes him a part of the construction process form the beginning (see: final scenes of Ep. III). You can tell that it was CGI, but I thought they did a pretty good job with a tough task. On the young Leia point, they could have very easily avoided that shot by never showing her face and having her say what she said, and when I saw the film the first time I thought that is what they were going to do. Personally, I would have been fine with that, but I suppose they felt since they had already set a precedent with how they handled Tarkin, they felt they could do the same with Leia. I don't know what I would have done if I were sitting in the director's chair for that scene.
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Wasn't she supposed to say "It's a new hope" instead of "It's hope"? This would have given it a tie in to the name of Episode IV. Oh well.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#464
masseffect7 wrote:
Spoiler:      SHOW
I always find it interesting to see what things professional movie reviewers latch onto. Often one person will make a fuss about something, and then a bunch of other reviewers will attack the same thing like sharks. In this film, it's the inclusion of Grand Moff Tarkin and a 19 year old Leia, both done using CGI. I've seen multiple reviews moralizing about how unethical it was to use a CGI Peter Cushing. To this, I have two responses. Firstly, the filmmakers consulted with Cushing's family to try to capture any subtle details as well as they could. They included him with permission of his estate. In doing so, I think they avoid the ethical questions that these uninformed professional reviewers raise from their cushy jobs at places like The Guardian, New York Times, etc (I have particular disdain for these publications). Secondly, you really cannot have a film about the first Death Star without Tarkin, especially with how Episode III makes him a part of the construction process form the beginning (see: final scenes of Ep. III). You can tell that it was CGI, but I thought they did a pretty good job with a tough task. On the young Leia point, they could have very easily avoided that shot by never showing her face and having her say what she said, and when I saw the film the first time I thought that is what they were going to do. Personally, I would have been fine with that, but I suppose they felt since they had already set a precedent with how they handled Tarkin, they felt they could do the same with Leia. I don't know what I would have done if I were sitting in the director's chair for that scene.
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I can't agree more. I thought it was pretty cool how well Tarkin was done. Yes, the eyes were off somewhat, but honestly if I didn't know he was CGI I might not have noticed. Leia wasn't done as well, but still, for the whole 3 seconds of screen time I can let it go.

Over all, I am really surprised at all the negative reviews and press this movie has. Considering how most people gave Force Awakenings a free pass when it was just A New Hope redone it's even more surprising.

Now, not to flip flop, but on my second viewing, I do have nit pick something. The whole Saw Gererra stuff seems out of place. From the out of nowhere tentacle rape monster to the suicide when he could have just left with them (perhaps because Forest Whitaker was costly to use?). It just doesn't fit. I imagine going by the trailers that a bunch of his stuff was cut.
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Re: All things Star Wars.

#465
@Zanteogo
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Well, considering he doesn't have legs anymore, it's doubtful he could have ran to the ship, so I wouldn't necessarily have called it a suicide. It seems that he's no longer in a combat role, but instead in a command role, so I don't think he would have been useful to the story going forward. But I did think that his character was going to be a larger part of the storyline. I was pretty surprised when he was killed off as early as he was. I think the cast was a little too crowded as it was, so killing him off was probably better than keeping him around. What it comes down to is that there are some foundational flaws in the storyline and character development. None of them are as serious as there were in The Force Awakens, but they are there, so these issues that we bring up can't be fixed by just keeping a character around longer.

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