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Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#32
Silverware wrote:
charnode wrote:fwiw I tend to use https://atom.io/ for my text editing purposes.
I also use Atom, when I am dealing with small files, or remote systems.
Notepad++ on windows is better for large files, if I am on a nix system and need a large file edited, well that's what VIM is for. :V
Aaaah, Atom. Atom is cool. I like it. ^^

I sometimes use codepen.io when I want to test something webdesign related or repl.it when I want to test something quickly in a specific programming language.

Notepad++ is my favorite text editor when it comes to all sorts of plaintext files that don't need formatting (.ini, .log, .bat and whatever file I need to change something in quickly. I set it as my standard editor for Filezilla).

Grumblesaur wrote: Sublime Text is for people who copy/paste their code.
What makes you think that? :think:
Automation engineer, lateral thinker, soldier, addicted to music, books and gaming.
Nothing to see here
Flatfingers wrote: 23.01.2017: "Show me the smoldering corpse of Perfectionist Josh"

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#33
JanB1 wrote:
Silverware wrote:
charnode wrote:fwiw I tend to use https://atom.io/ for my text editing purposes.
I also use Atom, when I am dealing with small files, or remote systems.
Notepad++ on windows is better for large files, if I am on a nix system and need a large file edited, well that's what VIM is for. :V
Aaaah, Atom. Atom is cool. I like it. ^^

I sometimes use codepen.io when I want to test something webdesign related or repl.it when I want to test something quickly in a specific programming language.

Notepad++ is my favorite text editor when it comes to all sorts of plaintext files that don't need formatting (.ini, .log, .bat and whatever file I need to change something in quickly. I set it as my standard editor for Filezilla).

Grumblesaur wrote: Sublime Text is for people who copy/paste their code.
What makes you think that? :think:
Try c9.io if you need to test things. :V Basically a tiny VM you get some control over :3
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Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#34
I am quite confused by the concept of people using different text editors for different situations. The case that makes sense to me is knowing how to use vi even when that's not your first choice (because some version of it is available by default almost everywhere), and there are some language-specific cases where certain editors are almost mandatory. Otherwise I feel people should learn one editor really well and want to use it for everything. I guess it helps to pick an editor that you can use everywhere. I think I'd go a bit nuts if I was regularly switching editors/features/key bindings.

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#36
I disagree. I don't think its a good idea to force any one tool to fit all situations. I use vim extensively for my development needs. However, sometimes I just need a quick text pane open to jot something down or hold a paste-buffer, in which case it is quite nice to have sublime just a click away.

And there's also the education angle. Several things in my vimrc were inspired by trying out spacemacs.

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#37
Employee 2-4601 wrote:I am quite confused by the concept of people using different text editors for different situations. The case that makes sense to me is knowing how to use vi even when that's not your first choice (because some version of it is available by default almost everywhere), and there are some language-specific cases where certain editors are almost mandatory. Otherwise I feel people should learn one editor really well and want to use it for everything. I guess it helps to pick an editor that you can use everywhere. I think I'd go a bit nuts if I was regularly switching editors/features/key bindings.
Learn multiple editors very well, and you will have more tools available. :V
Some are better at some things than others, not all text editors are worth the effort.

Notepad for instance is pretty shit.

Notepad++ is nice, but has areas it lacks in, especially in the visuals department, and it's a pain to use it to access files on a remote system.

Atom.io is pretty, but can't open large files, however it does have the advantage of a ton of tools that make editing on a remote system easy as pie.

Vim is a solid editor, but lacks a bunch of mouse control that I feel is almost entirely required in the modern day. Especially when used through a remote shell.


I haven't found a single thing that Sublime can do that can't be replicated in Atom/Notepad++/Vim, so yeah. I'll stick with my three editors of choice. V:
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Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#39
Graf wrote:
Employee 2-4601 wrote:Otherwise I feel people should learn one editor really well and want to use it for everything.
I hear EMACS is basically an operating system written in lua. That everything enough for you? :P
Lisp rather than Lua(*). The Emacs Lisp interpreter and performance-critical code is written in C, but everything else is written in Emacs Lisp (and extensible via the same -- it's not exactly the "operating system" people joke about, but it is at its core a live and malleable lisp environment, which makes it exceptionally flexible). And yes, that's the editor I use (everywhere for everything) :) (which I'll admit possibly skews my expectations of what other editors ought to be capable of).

(*) For starters Lua is less than 25 years old -- that's not nearly old enough for Emacs ;)

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#40
Silverware wrote: Try c9.io if you need to test things. :V Basically a tiny VM you get some control over :3
Hmm...thanks! I'll take a look. But on first glance, it seems like it needs more setup. Cool thing for repl.it is when you want to test out like...1 function. Just something that came up your mind and you're not sure if it works. It's done in a few seconds. For me, c9.io looks like a tool to test large bits of code without the hassle of a compiler or the need to set up a web server to test web-dev related things. Or am I wrong with my first glance?
Automation engineer, lateral thinker, soldier, addicted to music, books and gaming.
Nothing to see here
Flatfingers wrote: 23.01.2017: "Show me the smoldering corpse of Perfectionist Josh"

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#43
Jazehiah wrote:
Talvieno wrote:True oldschool is MS-DOS Edit. ;)
Yes.
I respectfully disagree, as noted in my comment above about TECO... and even that, with its fancy-schmancy CRT screen, isn't oldschool enough for those who used punchcards and paper tape. The same goes for the ISPF editor under MVS/TSO.

That said, I will award partial credit for EDLIN. It, at least, predated visual editing; changing code meant supplying a line number and and an operation (e.g., "in line 5, replace 'priny' with 'print'").

But I admit I was happy to deep-six EDLIN for the one true best text editor ever, BRIEF. It moved code from my brain to a file faster than anything else I've ever used. And if there was something it didn't do out of the box, it was easily extended using an intuitive scripting language (meaning, not LISP).

I miss BRIEF.

Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#44
JanB1 wrote:
Silverware wrote: Try c9.io if you need to test things. :V Basically a tiny VM you get some control over :3
Hmm...thanks! I'll take a look. But on first glance, it seems like it needs more setup. Cool thing for repl.it is when you want to test out like...1 function. Just something that came up your mind and you're not sure if it works. It's done in a few seconds. For me, c9.io looks like a tool to test large bits of code without the hassle of a compiler or the need to set up a web server to test web-dev related things. Or am I wrong with my first glance?
Basically that, C9 is good for smallish projects.
repl is good for instant gratification of small chunks of code. Most of what you can do there can be done in a node.js terminal. Or the browser console on any random webpage.
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Re: Thursday, April 13, 2017

#45
Flatfingers wrote:an intuitive scripting language (meaning, not LISP).
Hey :)

I genuinely feel that people who don't like Lisp probably haven't spent enough time with Lisp. 'tis all subjective, though. The original Emacs was actually TECO based (as we're on the subject), but I'll admit that TECO scares me, so I think I'm glad I never used that. AFAIK the Multics implementation of Emacs was the first Lisp-based one (and http://multicians.org/mepap.html is a good read about that, if you're keen on that sort of thing).

BRIEF sounds interesting; I've not heard of that before. Ah, I see it was a DOS,OS/2,Windows thing. Apparently crisp-mode provides "CRiSP/Brief editor" key bindings in Emacs :) (but presumably nothing more than that).

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