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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#61
MrPerson wrote:my best purchase was probably skyrim, paying 60$ for it with all DLC about a year after it came out on PC, now I have nearly 360 hours in it. that is the sign of a good game for the money.
I've spent way too many hours playing PC Skyrim (well over 800) and I can always find something interesting to do. I probably spent about the same amount of time in each of its predecessors. Over the years TES have taken a huge chunk of my free time. The single player games always have something new to offer if you want to turn to the depth of talent in the modding community . :D

I can't match you in your wise outlay of cash on games. Collectors never see it that way. I have all the released versions of the game. The most problematic of them was the Collector's Edition which almost fills a small room. :lol:
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#63
The only game I ever fully collected were all the PSP monster hunter games. I only ever play monster hunter freedom unite and an english patched monster hunter portable third (would have been freedom 3) but I still have monster hunter freedom one and two, just so I can say I have all the monster hunters. that game I probably have 400 hours in freedom unite and 200 in portable 3rd. I also have the Wii one but I never got into that one much for some reason, and they took down the servers for it soon after I got it. Wish they would have kept making Wii or PSP versions, I am not buying a whole WiiU for just monster hunter, no matter how much I love it.

but yea that is the only series I intentionally collected all the games for, except halo. I have every major console halo game too, but its my older brother's
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#65
That's the real difference between a dedicated game player and a collector MrPerson. You get to chose what you want to add but I can't help myself. Many players will settle for a digital download but the collector has to have the box, the shiny discs, the glossy manual, the scale figure, the playing cards, the cloth map (hopefully), the ...... whatever.

I can draw the distinction between the stuff in the box and the merchandise outside the box, to some extent, but the large hardcover books are a definite must have. :mrgreen:

That's why I tend to go for kickstarters or games like ESO which offer physical content. :D
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#66
To each their own I guess. If I have to have a Physical copy of something I always go for the real box (not one of those crappy generic game stop ones) with the manual and everything.

personally if you got all that extra stuff with all your purchases I could see my house getting cluttered REAL fast. what do you do with it all?
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#67
MrPerson wrote:personally if you got all that extra stuff with all your purchases I could see my house getting cluttered REAL fast. what do you do with it all?
Collectors always find a way. We are masters in the art of making display space in our homes. Unfortunately my collection doesn't begin and end with games. It's always neat and tidy but you don't want to be moving too fast as there is likely to be irreparable damage caused. :lol:
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#68
Big, huuuuuuuuuuuge changes to ESO! One of the biggest complaints seemed to be that it didn't feel like an 'Elder Scrolls' game. You were funneled, at least through the first 10 levels or so, through small, isolated starter isles for each faction. The game didn't open up until later. But no more. As of the next patch (which apparently is going to accompany another beta event!), when you finish the tutorial, you're teleported to your faction's first major city, and free to explore the whole of Tamriel however you please. You CAN still go to those starter isles from that point, and take on the quests which will still be there and still tailored for early level players, but you no longer have to. It has turned ESO with one fell swoop, into a sandbox experience as an Elder Scrolls game should be.

They also added collision detection (which was sorely needed in combat) in PvE. And increased lootable objects, ie: more barrels, chests, objects to loot and pick up shiny stuff. But all the way round, great, big ol' changes for the better and it's heartening to see the developers taking some of the recent criticisms and suggestions for the game to heart.
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#69
Those changes were what I was hoping for. It will certainly make my initial game experience far more enjoyable and, as you say, provides that sandbox experience. It's good to know they are listening. I may have to revise my available window of time. I still need to experience it first hand before I'm convinced.

Thanks for doing what you do best Matt. :thumbup:
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#71
MrPerson wrote:my only concern with exploration is that you cant do everything solo. arent dungeons and the AI designed to fight multiple people? so how hard or interesting do you think it would be if you tried to do a whole dungeon solo?
Not necessarily. Some dungeons are designed for groups but the rest are fully capable of being soloed.
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Re: Elder Scrolls Online

#72
Matthew Cason wrote:
MrPerson wrote:my only concern with exploration is that you cant do everything solo. arent dungeons and the AI designed to fight multiple people? so how hard or interesting do you think it would be if you tried to do a whole dungeon solo?
Not necessarily. Some dungeons are designed for groups but the rest are fully capable of being soloed.
I just wish that ALL dungeons were soloable. like when the dungeon loaded it takes into effect how many are in the party and changes stats/number of mobs to fit to how many people are in the party

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