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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#76
Damocles wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:46 am
here the same demo using an additional js-function to set the document focus, in case the keys do not react:
spaceclutter RCS demo (start with js focus support)

Please test if you had an issue with the keys not responding. Its basically just adding an event handler that sets the focus when clicking onto the webpage:

document.onmousedown = function() {window.focus();console.log("get focus");};
Doesn't work for me either. But please don't worry about it, I'm sure the problem is completely on my side with my system setup here. :ghost:
professional lurker since forever
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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#83
Damocles wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:32 pm
Added a silly soundeffect for the rockets (they are actually called missiles or?)
It all starts with bombs. Generally speaking, a bomb is a warhead without any form of internal propulsion (such as a motor or jet) and with no guidance. You drop it, it travels according to gravity and inertia. (If it doesn't move, it's a "mine.")

A "rocket" is thus a bomb (a warhead) plus some form of propulsion (such as a motor or jet) but no guidance system. You shoot it in a direction, it travels in that direction.

A "missile" is a rocket (warhead plus propulsion) with a guidance system. Usually that guidance is onboard and actively steers the whole package toward a (possibly moving) target.

(A "torpedo" is generally treated in space games like a relatively slow-moving missile with a larger-than-usual warhead.)

There are some exceptions to these in real life, but this is the basic distinction used in a lot of games.
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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#84
Flatfingers wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:35 pm

It all starts with bombs. Generally speaking, a bomb is a warhead without any form of internal propulsion (such as a motor or jet) and with no guidance. You drop it, it travels according to gravity and inertia. (If it doesn't move, it's a "mine.")

A "rocket" is thus a bomb (a warhead) plus some form of propulsion (such as a motor or jet) but no guidance system. You shoot it in a direction, it travels in that direction.

A "missile" is a rocket (warhead plus propulsion) with a guidance system. Usually that guidance is onboard and actively steers the whole package toward a (possibly moving) target.

(A "torpedo" is generally treated in space games like a relatively slow-moving missile with a larger-than-usual warhead.)

There are some exceptions to these in real life, but this is the basic distinction used in a lot of games.
Thanks for the overview Flatfingers. So my naming ist correct (currently). They will however upgrade to missiles eventually, also doing fancy course correction maneuvers.
The current implementation is just for fun, (and for testing some mechanics), as I plan a less direct control scheme for the weapon system.
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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#87
Damocles wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:20 am
Did anyone have the chance to test it on a Mac and/or Safari?

I wonder if there might be some Apple specific issues, before the project gets too big to track down problems.
Just tried it in desktop Safari (on PC): "Your browser does not support WebGL". :(

For giggles, I also tried it in Opera, but it seems to have got stuck about 85% of the way through loading. Not sure if my currently glitchy Internet connection has anything to do with that or not (for now).
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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#88
Damocles wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:20 am
Did anyone have the chance to test it on a Mac and/or Safari?

I wonder if there might be some Apple specific issues, before the project gets too big to track down problems.
Yup, it seems perfectly fine on my macbook pro 2015 on safari. Rock solid 60 when I'm not locking at the center of the asteroid field. When I look at the asteroid field though it fluctuates wildly between 39 and 55, but I didn't notice any drop. Now I must say that this is a very underpowered laptop, it's basically a potato for games with it's lack of a discrete graphics card. The graphics is Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory. So yes, the fact that it runs is great. No glaring bugs, the engine noise works, not sure what else to test. Noticed a bit of the asteroid popping, not too bad. There was a flashing light on the planet, it seemed like it was supposed to be there though.

Edit: I've tested it on chrome on this computer and it's a solid 60fps everywhere almost all the time, it dips every now and then to like 58, and I'm not sure why. I now realize that the flashing light was not on the planet, but an actual object in the game, don't mind me being an idiot with this sort of thing. I tried to look for it, but then ran into the shadow of an asteroid and I couldn't see a thing. I think there should be some sort of self-illumination of your ship, so that if you are in the shadow of an asteroid, you can see your ship. Or have a background nebula or something so that I can see the outline of my ship against the brighter background.
A life well lived only happens once.
Seems deep until you think about it.
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Re: 10000 Asteroids Testlevel (WebGL)

#89
vector67 wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 2:12 am
Yup, it seems perfectly fine on my macbook pro 2015 on safari. Rock solid 60 when I'm not locking at the center of the asteroid field. When I look at the asteroid field though it fluctuates wildly between 39 and 55, but I didn't notice any drop. Now I must say that this is a very underpowered laptop, it's basically a potato for games with it's lack of a discrete graphics card. The graphics is Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory. So yes, the fact that it runs is great. No glaring bugs, the engine noise works, not sure what else to test. Noticed a bit of the asteroid popping, not too bad. There was a flashing light on the planet, it seemed like it was supposed to be there though.

Edit: I've tested it on chrome on this computer and it's a solid 60fps everywhere almost all the time, it dips every now and then to like 58, and I'm not sure why. I now realize that the flashing light was not on the planet, but an actual object in the game, don't mind me being an idiot with this sort of thing. I tried to look for it, but then ran into the shadow of an asteroid and I couldn't see a thing. I think there should be some sort of self-illumination of your ship, so that if you are in the shadow of an asteroid, you can see your ship. Or have a background nebula or something so that I can see the outline of my ship against the brighter background.
Ok, good that it runs on your Mac. Though Flatfingers browser did not activate WebGL, at least I know that the Mac-OS has no general problem with the engine.

You could test if the rocket sound comes up. (hit space), as its a wav, where the "engine humm" is an ogg file.

The system here is very dark, there will be some brighter systems, where ship outlines will be more visible. I will probably add a slight self-illumination on the ship, to see it in dark areas. But some levels will have pitch-black areas. (as it should be in space). Making the spotlight (and flares) your only light source.

The flashing beacon you saw is on the dark side of the very big asteroid, directly at the "wall". Just follow the blinking, and you can see some small objects with you spotlight when you are close.

The level is sill quite packed, and only uses the engines LOD and culling. Later I will implement manual culling, and maybe also replacements (several asteroids in one object) for asteroid-fields at a far distance.

Thanks for testing everyone.

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