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Re: Net Neutrality

#91
I don't necessarily think monopolies are really a rural v. urban phenomenon. In my experience living in rural areas I found that there were more options than the urban areas in the same state. Now I live in a different state and the urban areas have a lot of selection. I've lived in red and blue areas with monopolies and without monopolies. ISP policy is really one of those things that can be hard to peg down as a strict red v. blue issue.

I understand the reasoning why a locality would choose to enforce a monopoly for internet and cable service, I just disagree with the policy because I think the harm it creates is far greater than anything good that could come of it. Satellite or some other wireless internet system would be great for rural areas, it's just too expensive right now.
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Re: Net Neutrality

#92
masseffect7 wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:30 pm
Satellite or some other wireless internet system would be great for rural areas, it's just too expensive right now.
satellites are literally the worst possible platform for bidirectional many user connections which occasionally require low round trip times.
hard mass and power limited systems 1/10 lightsecond away from everything else with extremely narrow angles between clients and a gigantic amount of clients.
basically a textbook example of "worst case".

put up a couple of terrestrial directed microwave links and a normal LTE/GSM base station at the end of it.
a million times cheaper, faster and easier to maintain and upgrade.
and probably quite a bit cheaper per kilometer than glass fiber cables in environments without interference (read: rural areas)
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Re: Net Neutrality

#93
masseffect7 wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:30 pm
I don't necessarily think monopolies are really a rural v. urban phenomenon. In my experience living in rural areas I found that there were more options than the urban areas in the same state. Now I live in a different state and the urban areas have a lot of selection. I've lived in red and blue areas with monopolies and without monopolies. ISP policy is really one of those things that can be hard to peg down as a strict red v. blue issue.

I understand the reasoning why a locality would choose to enforce a monopoly for internet and cable service, I just disagree with the policy because I think the harm it creates is far greater than anything good that could come of it. Satellite or some other wireless internet system would be great for rural areas, it's just too expensive right now.
Broadband services and pricing involve factors beyond physical location. That said, the primary issue for what is available is profitability. Major service providers have no interest operating in sparsely populated regions because of the combination of limited revenues and high fixed costs. Localities in the middle of nowhere do not 'enforce' a monopoly system for telecom services, they rely on government subsidies to have those services in the first place.

AT&T (prior to its original break up) and its successor RBOCs worked because their networks combined urban (profitable) and rural (unprofitable) areas within their operating regions. The evolution of broadband and wireless has fractured that business model. AT&T, Verizon, and the cable giants have absolutely no interest in expanding their services in unprofitable areas (in fact, AT&T and Verizon are trying to sell existing operations that fall outside of their core). Frontier, Windstream, and CenturyLink are the largest independent carriers and all three are under significant financial stress because they are losing legacy customers in urban areas to cord cutting and broadband bundles while having to maintain their existing infrastructure. CenturyLink merged with Level 3 to focus on its huge fiber network and enterprise services. Windstream and Frontier are trying to get bigger to put off the day of (financial) reckoning. Perhaps innovation will change the telecom landscape. As things stand, regulation (and subsidies in unprofitable service areas) are necessities.
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