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Colors are weird, man

#1
Colorblind (usually) != cannot see color. It's more a matter of "cannot distinguish certain pairs of colors." So it would be more useful to identify sets of two or more colors. Like {dull red, tan} or {dark purple, blue} or {light purple, pink} or {that weird orange color, that weird green color}.

Also, what the hell hue is brown, anyway? All the browns I can find are heavy on red, but they look red.

Color is weird and it angers me. :ghost:

Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#2
0111narwhalz wrote:Colorblind (usually) != cannot see color. It's more a matter of "cannot distinguish certain pairs of colors." So it would be more useful to identify sets of two or more colors. Like {dull red, tan} or {dark purple, blue} or {light purple, pink} or {that weird orange color, that weird green color}.

Also, what the hell hue is brown, anyway? All the browns I can find are heavy on red, but they look red.

Color is weird and it angers me. :ghost:
Brown is related to Orange. See 74-76
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#5
0111narwhalz wrote: Also, what the hell hue is brown, anyway? All the browns I can find are heavy on red, but they look red.

Color is weird and it angers me. :ghost:
If talking about it in the form of RGB, Brown is two parts red to one part green, divided by two. (a darker red + red + green).
If talking about it in the form of painting, brown is one part red, one part yellow, and one part black.

(As yellow, in RGB, is red + green, it makes sense. :) Red + (red + green/yellow). )
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#7
That makes sense of a sort too, as you're likely to end up with an ugly light gray color. :D See, red and green become an ugly brownish color when mixed together because there's no blue to speak of, making it darker. Likewise, red + blue is going to make a dark purple of around 128,0,128. It's basically adding the colors together and dividing by two. :D (Or three, if it's three colors of equal parts)

For this reason, it's impossible to get white with any color except white when you're painting - and the same with black.
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#8
TLDR brown is dark orange
Talvieno wrote:That makes sense of a sort too, as you're likely to end up with an ugly light gray color. :D See, red and green become an ugly brownish color when mixed together because there's no blue to speak of, making it darker. Likewise, red + blue is going to make a dark purple of around 128,0,128. It's basically adding the colors together and dividing by two. :D (Or three, if it's three colors of equal parts)

For this reason, it's impossible to get white with any color except white when you're painting - and the same with black.
Well, actually:
light is additive colour, paint substractive.
There is red, green and blue light. Red and green together appear yellow, red and blue appear cyan, and blue and red appear magenta.
Paint (and everything) however doesn't emit light, it absorbs light of certain colours.
Cyan objects absorb red light, leaving the blue and green; yellow objects absorb blue light, leaving red and green; magenta objects absorb green light, leaving blue and red.

Mixing paint makes it absorb 2 colours: cyan + yellow absorbs red and blue, leaving green. Same for other colours.
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#9
Dinosawer wrote:TLDR brown is dark orange
Well, actually:
light is additive colour, paint substractive.
There is red, green and blue light. Red and green together appear yellow, red and blue appear cyan, and blue and red appear magenta.
Paint (and everything) however doesn't emit light, it absorbs light of certain colours.
Cyan objects absorb red light, leaving the blue and green; yellow objects absorb blue light, leaving red and green; magenta objects absorb green light, leaving blue and red.

Mixing paint makes it absorb 2 colours: cyan + yellow absorbs red and blue, leaving green. Same for other colours.
Did schools stop teaching this, because my wife didn't know it either, and yet I am 100% sure I learned it in Primary...
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#11
Silverware wrote: Did schools stop teaching this, because my wife didn't know it either, and yet I am 100% sure I learned it in Primary...
I learned red yellow blue in primary school, and later learned that is in fact complete bollocks :ghost:
Talvieno wrote:
Dinosawer wrote:snip
Yes, I know this, Dino. I'm talking specifically about RGB colors on a computer screen.
No you weren't. Or if you were, you were wrong, because adding rgb makes it lighter, not darker. :ghost:
Talvieno wrote:See, red and green become an ugly brownish color when mixed together because there's no blue to speak of, making it darker.
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#12
Okay, I wasn't then. :lol: Regardless, I already understand what you're saying, even if you said it more eloquently.

Also, I remember learning red/yellow/blue in primary school too.

edit: :monkey: :squirrel: :ghost: :monkey: :squirrel: :ghost: :monkey: :squirrel: :ghost: :monkey:
more edits because Dino doesn't like edits
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<Dinosawer> geez tal stop editing posts i'm replying to
edit :ghost: edit :ghost: edit
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#13
Hmm...I think most of us learned the RYB system in school. Then, as soon as we came into the world of programming, we learned about the RGB or sRGB. And when you print stuff you use the CMY system. And when you PAINT stuff, you use the the NCS system that uses white, black, green, yellow, red and blue. :D

Edit: And now shush. Go have this debate somewhere else. And debate like grown man, not like little babies who throw mud at each other and scream "You are wrong!". Leave that to the politicians. :ghost:
Last edited by JanB1 on Mon May 15, 2017 12:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#14
There are only two correct systems.

Additive and Subtrative.
Additive is Light, and the three primary colors are RGB.
Subtractive is paints/inks, and the three primary colors are CYM (Cyan Yellow Magenta).

Many printers also include Black (CYMK) because its cheaper to use a dedicated black ink for black text/areas.


Any other system is an attempt to bastardize one of these two.
There are multiple systems to represent what mixes of each to use, such as RGB, HSL, HSI... and these are all acceptable.
As they all produce a CYM or RGB output.


Including things like HDR (High Dynamic Range) simply alters the curves for light levels. So that when some areas are in high brightness (eg the clouds with the sun behind them) you can still see the color of a relatively *VERY* dark area, such as inside.
The output of these systems is still RGB when displayed on a screen, or CYM when printed onto a surface.


I don't understand why this doesn't seem to be taught anymore. :(
Its quite important to understand the difference between the two.
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Re: Friday, May 5, 2017

#15
Silverware wrote:There are only two correct systems.

Additive and Subtrative.
Additive is Light, and the three primary colors are RGB.
Subtractive is paints/inks, and the three primary colors are CYM (Cyan Yellow Magenta).

Many printers also include Black (CYMK) because its cheaper to use a dedicated black ink for black text/areas.


Any other system is an attempt to bastardize one of these two.
There are multiple systems to represent what mixes of each to use, such as RGB, HSL, HSI... and these are all acceptable.
As they all produce a CYM or RGB output.


Including things like HDR (High Dynamic Range) simply alters the curves for light levels. So that when some areas are in high brightness (eg the clouds with the sun behind them) you can still see the color of a relatively *VERY* dark area, such as inside.
The output of these systems is still RGB when displayed on a screen, or CYM when printed onto a surface.


I don't understand why this doesn't seem to be taught anymore. :(
Its quite important to understand the difference between the two.
And what's about NCS? :?:
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